Fringe (season 1)

{5/5} “The advances of science — which is supposed to expand our knowledge of the universe — will, if not carefully controlled, destroy the world as we know it… Our technological ambitions have not only driven us to the brink of catastrophe, the catastrophe has already begun.”

FBI Agent Olivia Dunham joins the Fringe Division, investigating mysterious occurrences that may have some connection to something called “the pattern.” She works with Walter Bishop, a scientist who did some questionable experiments years ago and who’s been in a mental institution for 17 years. Walter’s son Peter, who’s a genius and knows about a lot of things, tries to keep his father on track.

Fringe season 1 originally aired in 2008-09.

I was hooked from the first episode. It’s a very exciting show — every episode will have you on the edge of your seat. In fact, if there’s a TV show that’s more exciting than this one I don’t know what it is.

The show is reminiscent of The X-Files, but only in a general way — the characters and situations are different.

A few episodes are a bit gruesome.

Other than that I loved it — the individual storylines were interesting and the ongoing story was fascinating. I’m glad I don’t have to wait to watch season 2.

The music is exciting and interesting. The credits list the composer as Michael Giacchino (Star Trek Into Darkness) but apparently after the first episode the music was written by his associates Chad Seiter (Chapman) and Chris Tilton (the TV show Alcatraz).

Anna Torv (the TV show The Secret Life of Us) plays Olivia. John Noble (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King) plays Walter and Joshua Jackson (the TV show Dawson’s Creek) plays Peter.

Lance Reddick (guest star on the TV show Lost) plays Broyles and Kirk Acevedo (Dinner Rush) plays Charlie. Jasika Nicole (She’s Out of My League) plays Astrid.

Mark Valley (the TV show Boston Legal) plays John. Leonard Nimoy (Star Trek) plays William Bell in the season finale.

The show was created by J.J. Abrams (the TV show Lost), Alex Kurtzman (director of People Like Us), and Roberto Orci (the TV show Sleepy Hollow). Abrams directed Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness, and Kurtzman and Orci wrote those two movies.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 at 5:42 pm and is filed under Reviews of TV shows. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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